Integrated Country Strategy: GREECE

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
- Advertisement -

FOR PUBLIC RELEASE

Table of Contents

  1. Chief of Mission Priorities 1
  2. Mission Strategic Framework 6
  3. Mission Goals and Objectives 9
  4. Management Objectives 19

1.   Chief of Mission Priorities

Greece is a driver of stability in a region of increasing importance and complexity, in particular given the aspirations of our strategic competitors. This NATO Ally and EU Member State helps protect both organizations’ southeastern flank, and thus our own interests, but continued progress will require sustained and high-level engagement. A change in government (elections must be held by July 2023) could also be a risk factor; though anti-Americanism has largely evaporated in much of the body politic, this is not irreversible. We will seek to leverage Athens’ enhanced military and diplomatic outreach into the Middle East and north Africa as a force multiplier; at the same time, Greece’s more robust leadership in the western Balkans will help stabilize a region that is still struggling to move forward toward Euro-Atlantic integration. Our improved relationship enjoys almost unprecedented public support in Greece, and we will continue to build partnerships across the political spectrum as well as civil society, with a key emphasis on women’s empowerment, the rights of asylum seekers and migrants, and an improved environment for both LGBTQI+ and other minority rights and inclusion. The U.S.- Greece Strategic Dialogue process we inaugurated in 2018 has moved our objectives quickly forward, in large part thanks to cabinet-level attention on both sides; this will continue to serve as the infrastructure on which to pursue our ICS objectives.

Mission Goal 1: Greece further enhances its capability and support of regional and global security and stability, which protects the United States and its interests

2018-2021 saw U.S.-Greece mil-mil cooperation grow at a rate not seen for decades; this is the most visible facet of the burgeoning bilateral relationship, also enjoying strong bipartisan Congressional support. Deployments of U.S. rotational forces and participation in bilateral and multilateral exercises have increased nearly fourfold during this period – with strong public support overall. Thanks to two significant upgrades to the U.S.-Greece Mutual Defense Cooperation Agreement (MDCA) in 2019 and 2021, the port of Alexandroupoli now permits U.S. and Allied military equipment to deploy rapidly into Greece and then on into southeast Europe, bypassing the Bosporus and countering Russian aggression on NATO’s eastern flank. In 2021 alone, U.S., Greek, and Allied forces processed over 2800 pieces of U.S. and Allied equipment, to include more than 165 main battle tanks and tracked vehicles, and 135 utility and attack helicopters. Also in 2021, Greece has committed to spending 3.93% of its GDP on defense with 38.3% of the budget allocated to major equipment purchases and modernization, exceeding its 2014 Wales Summit pledge. Significant military purchases and upgrades in recent years include the procurement of seven MH-60R helicopters, 1,200 Armored Security Vehicles, 4 MK-V Special Operations Craft, and upgrades to their P-3B, S-70B, CH-47D, and F-16 fleet. The Hellenic Navy has been laser-focused on upgrading its fleet as well, with a tentative deal announced with France to procure 3 Belharra Frigates; this modernization effort could also include procurements of additional ships, to include Lockheed Martin frigates, Corvettes, and upgrades to the Hellenic Navy’s MEKO class frigates. The Greek Government has also expressed keen interest in joining the F-35 Joint Strike-Fighter program, as well as future procurements of MQ-9 Unmanned Aerial Systems, AH-64E Apaches, as well as upgrades to their M-270 MLRS and Patriot systems.

The consolidation of the 2018 Prespa Agreement opened the door for Greece finally to realize its key role under the EU’s 2003 Thessaloniki Agenda, and has transformed Greece into a stronger EU partner for us. The current government is focused on the transatlantic bond and less so on strategic autonomy. We and the Greek government will continue to partner to move the countries of the western Balkans toward Euro-Atlantic integration; Greece’s enhanced partnerships with Albania, North Macedonia, and Kosovo are indispensable in this regard. We should harness the potential of the “3+1” process (Cyprus, Greece, Israel plus the United States) for our strategic interests in the broader Eastern Mediterranean region, and also leverage Greece’s significantly enhanced outreach into the Middle East and North Africa, consistent with the Administration’s Interim National Security Strategy’s re-focus on key alliances. We will also work assiduously to calm persistent Greece-Turkey tensions, which could worsen in the out years. Finally, Greece is a strong participant in U.S. law enforcement border security and information sharing platforms. We will enhance this cooperation even as we work with Greece to manage the flow of migrants and asylum-seekers safely and humanely, while integrating refugees into society.

Mission Goal 2: Greece increases trade and investment opportunities for U.S. companies, and enhances its role in advancing European energy security and regional economic integration, consistent with climate goals and while limiting Chinese and Russian economic influence

Greece’s V-shaped recovery in 2021 is strong evidence that the economic reforms carried out by the Greek government are working; we expect the recent strong pace of investments by major U.S. firms to continue — especially in the tech and energy sectors, where Greece will have 32B euros of EU Recovery and Resilience funds to invest in the coming years. We will seek to consolidate Greece’s role as a natural gas hub for the western Balkans and southeast Europe, ideally with U.S. firms playing a leading role, providing an alternative to Gazprom’s non-market based supply. Consistent with our Interim National Security Strategy, we will also simultaneously support Greece’s rapid de-lignitization and its plans to integrate its green energy market into Asia, north Africa, and the EU. Greece’s geostrategic position and abundant sun and wind make it a natural choice in this regard. We will continue to grow our bilateral partnership in mitigating the effects of climate change, including enhancing Greece’s ability to prevent and fight wildfires, as well as to deal with post-fire mitigation. We should also partner with Greece – which still has the largest commercial shipping fleet in the world – in the transformation to a green shipping paradigm.

We anticipate that those Greek industrial and high-tech firms that will have survived the decade-long economic crisis — compounded by the pandemic – will emerge as strong candidates to themselves invest in the United States, and we will focus on this accordingly with our enhanced Foreign Commercial Service presence. In the meantime, we will prioritize limiting the country’s exposure to PRC and other malign investment in key strategic sectors, especially as Greece’s continues to privatize key assets such as ports, shipyards, and the energy infrastructure. More Development Finance Corporation and Department of Commerce attention are necessary for success.

Mission Goal 3: Strong people-to-people ties with Greece foster favorable views of the United States and promote global alliances built upon shared democratic values

Greece has largely moved past populism and a reflexive skepticism about U.S. policies and intentions. We will consolidate these gains as we encourage continued political stability and openness to American education and culture as well as our key values of diversity, equity, and inclusion. The current Greek government is showing unprecedented willingness to partner with

U.S. educational institutions; as the pandemic subsides we expect to see the two-way flow of students and faculty increase dramatically. Russia and China have both attempted to make inroads in the cultural and educational space (and Russia also in the religious space), in an effort to gain influence; Greece now hosts three Confucius Institutes, for example, and both the Chinese and Russian embassies are active. Thus far the Greek public generally favors U.S. values and sees the United States as its primary partner, but this requires our constant engagement.

Greeks appreciated our efforts to help them celebrate their bicentennial as a modern European state in 2021; this effort solidified our common ground as democracies. Consistent with the Administration’s Interim National Security Strategy, we will build on this foundation as well as our strong reach into Greek civil society to promote women’s economic empowerment and improve the full and equitable integration of marginalized people into Greek society, in particular migrants and refugees, other minorities, and the LGBTQI+ community.

Mission Goal 4: Support and serve U.S. citizens traveling or residing in Greece

 U.S. tourism rebounded dramatically in 2021; this will likely continue if the pandemic continues to abate, as political stability and good governance have made Greece even more attractive as a destination (and the dynamic GoG has successfully extended the tourism season and is actively seeking more American visitors). Perhaps one million-plus U.S. citizens will visit Greece in each of the out-years, increasing the demand for both routine and special services on our relatively small Consular team. Additionally, over 100,000 U.S. citizens reside permanently here; this largely aging population will continue to require significant consular and Federal Benefits services. While Greece is rapidly improving access to its own bureaucracy through digitalization, we will need to adapt to ensure our citizens can take advantage of this, as well as improving our own systems for distributing information and services. The likelihood of continued significant wildfires in Greece as well as the lingering effects of the pandemic will require us to enhance our partnerships with Greece’s civil emergency institutions, who are themselves being compelled to transform rapidly.

2.   Mission Strategic Framework

Mission Goal 1: Greece further enhances its capability and support of regional and global security and stability, which protects the United States and its interests

  • Mission Objective 1.1: S. and Greece defense and security cooperation increase Greece’s capacity to support U.S. military operations in the Eastern Mediterranean and beyond
  • Mission Objective 1.2: Greece identifies, investigates, and prosecutes terrorism and other transnational crimes and deploys robust screening measures, sharing relevant information with the United States, while encouraging Greece to follow international law with regard to the rights of asylum seekers and reduce legislative and cultural barriers to the integration of refugees into society
  • Mission Objective 3: U.S. engagement encourages Greece to capitalize on its regional leadership role to promote EU and NATO integration, counter malign influence, and support stability and prosperity in the region

Mission Goal 2: Greece increases trade and investment opportunities for U.S. companies, and enhances its role in advancing European energy security and regional economic integration, consistent with its climate goals and while limiting Chinese and Russian economic influence

  • Mission Objective 2.1: By capitalizing on Greek reforms and EU Relief and Recovery Funds, U.S. exports of goods and services to Greece increase as does Greek investment in the United States
  • Mission Objective 2.2: Greece implements needed administrative and economic reforms, including increased digitalization of services to better and more efficiently provide government services in healthcare, waste management, women’s economic empowerment, and climate response and mitigation
  • Mission Objective 3: Support Greek leadership on climate goals and achieve energy security through U.S. investments that reduce Greek and regional dependency on Russian gas and expanded energy infrastructure

Mission Goal 3: Strong people-to-people ties with Greece foster favorable views of the United States and promote global alliances built upon shared democratic values

  • Mission Objective 3.1: The deepening of exchanges between U.S. and Greek academic institutions, professors, and students advances U.S. best practices in education and supports the internationalization of Greece’s education system
  • Mission Objective 3.2: Greek civil society, businesses, and government partners promote democracy, human rights, equal treatment and support for inclusion of marginalized and vulnerable members of society, including women, refugees, migrants, and individuals with disabilities
  • Mission Objective 3.3: Media engagement plus public diplomacy programs drive Greek capacity-building in innovation, technology, entrepreneurship, digital economy, environmental protection, and the creative industries, while countering malign influence, advancing shared democratic values, and promoting U.S. and NATO military alliances

Mission Goal 4: Support and serve U.S. citizens traveling or residing in Greece

  • Mission Objective 1: U.S. citizens residing or temporarily visiting Greece are protected and supported through the delivery of consular and related federal services in a vigilant, efficient, and timely manner

Management Objective 1: The Mission launches a cost-effective and agile management platform that improves workforce performance, efficiency, and effectiveness

Management Objective 2: The Mission enhances its safe and secure work and living environment enabling personnel to achieve mission goals and promoting wellness and a sense of community

3.   Mission Goals and Objectives

Mission Goal 1 | Greece further enhances its capability and support of regional and global security and stability, which protects the United States and its interests

Description | The Mission will work to further enhance Greece’s security and law enforcement capabilities, in alignment with and support of U.S. interests. We will also work with Greece regionally to help bring security, stability, and prosperity to the Eastern Mediterranean, Black Sea, and Western Balkans regions.

Objective 1.1 | U.S. and Greece defense and security cooperation increase Greece’s capacity to support U.S. military operations in the Eastern Mediterranean and beyond

  • Objective 1.1 Justification | Greece is a strategically located and capable NATO Ally and EU partner that is interested in further expanding its close defense partnership with the United States. The Naval Support Activity at Souda Bay and the Port of Alexandroupoli provide unique capabilities to the U.S. military. The defense relationship is also increasingly important as U.S. operational requirements in the region expand; Greece’s location is critical for EUCOM, CENTCOM, and AFRICOM requirements and directly support strategic competition. Through political advocacy, training and exercises, and implementation of the updated U.S.-Greece Mutual Defense Cooperation Agreement (MDCA), the United States will work to enhance Greek military capabilities and ensure continued, expanded access to sites for exercises, training, and other
  • Objective 1.1 Linkages | Interim National Security Strategy Guidance, JSP Strategic Objective 4, Goals 1 and 4 of the EUR Joint Regional Strategy
  • Objective 1 Risks | Failing to expand our defense and security relationship risks contributing to a less stable region, inhibits our effectiveness vis-a-vis strategic competition, and potentially limits U.S. capability to respond to regional security threats.

Objective 1.2 | Greece identifies, investigates, and prosecutes terrorism and other transnational crimes and deploys robust screening measures, sharing relevant information with the United States, while encouraging Greece to follow international law with regard to the rights of asylum seekers and reduce legislative and cultural barriers to the integration of refugees into society

  • Objective 1.2 Justification | Although the threat of international and domestic terrorism has decreased, Greece’s position on Europe’s front lines, combined with the annual arrival of thousands of migrants and asylum seekers to its borders, necessitates strong border security to prevent terrorist and organized crime transit to Western Europe and Improving institutional capacity to identify, investigate, and prosecute terrorists and criminals involved in transnational organized crimes is critical for Greece as well as the region. Greece is also poised to assume a leading role in improving the regional security landscape, especially through the use of U.S. border security programs. While balancing the need for strong border security and law enforcement activity, Greece should also prioritize the legal and human rights of migrants and asylum- seekers, in accordance with international laws and treaties. The United States can play a critical role in strengthening Greece’s capacity to fight terrorism and organized crime through strategic information and intelligence sharing and well-designed programs, while also helping to integrate asylum-seekers and refugees into Greek society.
  • Objective 1.2 Linkages | The goal is consistent with the 2018 National Strategy for Counterterrorism, the Interim National Security Strategic Guidance and the State-USAID 2022-2026 Joint Strategic Plan, Performance Goal Statements 1.1.4, 1.3.1, 1.3.3 and 3.4, and Strategic Objective 3.4, Performance Goal Statement 3.4.1, which identify ways to combat and prevent terrorism that threaten America’s safety and offer assistance to refugees and asylum seekers experiencing forced displacement.
  • Objective 1.2 Risks | The United States and Greece enjoy robust bilateral cooperation on counterterrorism, and the likelihood of not achieving our law enforcement objectives is low. However, balancing border security while respecting the rights of asylum seekers and migrants presents some implementation Failing to fully achieve this objective could mean a possible degradation of human rights standards in Greece. By focusing on the key objectives below, the United States can play a critical role in mitigating these risks and assisting Greece to achieve the delicate balance between protecting its borders and upholding the rights enshrined in international law.

Objective 1.3 | U.S. engagement encourages Greece to capitalize on its regional leadership role to promote EU and NATO integration, counter malign influence, and support stability and prosperity in the region

  • Objective 1.3 Justification | Improved relationships and enhanced cooperation between Greece and its neighbors will improve regional stability, increase regional economic prosperity, and decrease the region’s vulnerability to malign influence from Russia and other actors. The United States will encourage Greece to resolve any outstanding bilateral issues and to work within the EU and NATO to expand opportunities for its Western Balkan neighbors. The Mission will also encourage Greece to continue to expand its military engagement in the wider region to increase security and
  • Objective 1.3 Linkages | This goal reflects the aim of protecting the security of the American people by reaffirming and modernizing NATO as stated in the Interim National Security Strategy Guidance of March 2021. It also supports the State-USAID Joint Strategic Plan, Goal 1, Objectives 1.3 and 1.4, and Goals 1 and 3 of the EUR Joint Regional
  • Objective 1.3 Risks | Failure to achieve this objective cedes influence to U.S. strategic competitors, sets back EU and NATO integration, and could make the region less prosperous and stable. A loss of strategic access in Greece would also significantly impact the U.S. military’s ability to meet operational and contingency requirements in the region and beyond. The Mission will mitigate these risks through sustained engagement with the GoG and the Hellenic Armed

Mission Goal 2 | Greece increases trade and investment opportunities for U.S. companies, and enhances its role in advancing European energy security and regional economic integration, consistent with its climate goals and while limiting Chinese and Russian economic influence

Description | This goal reflects our Interim National Security Strategic Guidance to join with our partners to tackle the climate crisis; confront threats to our alliances and to international norms posed by Beijing and Moscow; and to ensure our trade and international economic policies serve all Americans, by expanding U.S. exports and creating jobs in the United States by attracting high-quality Greek investment. This goal also reflects the EUR Bureau’s JRS Goal 3 and 4.

Objective 2.1 | By capitalizing on Greek reforms and EU Relief and Recovery Funds (RRF), U.S. exports of goods and services to Greece increase as does Greek investment in the United States

  • Objective 2.1 Justification | The American people and economy benefit from expanded trade and investment with Greece, and the United States strategically needs Greece’s economy to fully recover from its decade-long crisis and the pandemic. The United States also has an interest in ensuring the Greek economy stays open and tied to international norms, while eschewing malign influence from state-controlled PRC or Russian
  • Objective 2.1 Linkages | Interim National Security Strategic Guidance, especially pp 8- 12, 15-16. EUR JRS Goals 3 (Objectives 1 and 2) and 4 (Objective 3)
  • Objective 2.1 Risks | Several of the risks presented by not achieving this objective include: EU RRF-related contracts are awarded exclusively to domestic firms; key infrastructure acquired by malign interests; investment screening mechanisms are not adequate to meet rising risks. The Mission will mitigate these risks by: advocating for transparency and opportunity for U.S. firm participation in RRF projects, given the enormous investment gap Greece faces; engaging with Greek government and U.S. bidders on strategic infrastructure; coordinating the maximum available advice and assistance to encourage a robust investment screening

Objective 2.2 | Greece implements needed administrative and economic reforms, including increased digitalization of services to better and more efficiently provide government services in healthcare, waste management, women’s economic empowerment, and climate adaptation.

  • Objective 2 Justification | Focus on these sectors will leverage key areas of strength in

U.S. technology and innovation, providing increased commercial opportunities for American firms. The objective will also help promote a sorely needed increase in diversity in Greece’s economy and society, ranked lowest for gender equality among the EU.

  • Objective 2 Linkages | Interim National Security Strategic Guidance, esp pp 8-12, 15-
  1. EUR JRS Goals 3 (Objectives 1 and 2) and 4 (Objective 1)
  • Objective 2.2 Risks | Reductions in near-term Russian gas supplies could force delay in meeting climate change goals; mitigation possible through increased U.S. LNG imports and diplomatic engagement to ease renewable energy permitting processes. The Greek government makes no progress on the clawback issue; to mitigate, Mission will ensure the issue is raised as frequently as possible in economic and diplomatic

Objective 2.3 | Support Greek leadership on climate goals and achieve energy security through

U.S. investments that reduce Greek and regional dependency on Russian gas and expanded energy infrastructure

  • Objective 3 Justification | Advancing European independence from Russian energy supplies remains a key U.S. strategic objective, freeing the region from undue malign influence throughout the region’s economies and governments. Climate change mitigation and adaption also remains a top national security imperative.
  • Objective 2.3 Linkages | Interim National Security Strategic Guidance, esp pp 11-12. EUR JRS Goals 3 (Objective 4) and 4 (Objectives 1, 3)
  • Objective 2.3 Risks | Some potential risks include: key regional energy infrastructure is stalled or canceled; lack of U.S. engagement allows malign investors to acquire strategic assets; Greek bureaucratic challenges prevent accomplishment of the government’s ambitious climate To mitigate these risks, the Mission will maintain a high level of engagement with key decision-makers for all strategic infrastructure projects; rally for

U.S. support to compete with other potential investors; and continue to lobby at all levels of the government to help break bureaucratic logjams.

Mission Goal 3 | Strong people-to-people ties with Greece foster favorable views of the United States and promote global alliances built upon shared democratic values

Description | This goal reflects the agenda of the 2021 Interim National Security Guidance. It also supports the State-USAID 2022-2026 Joint Strategic Plan, objectives 1.2 (Climate Change),

  • (Humanitarian Leadership), 1.4 (Peace and Security), 1.5 (Build support for American values), 2.4 (Strengthening Resilience), 3.1 (Democracy and Governance), 3.2 (Equity and Inclusion), 3.4 (Manage Migration), 3.5 (Improve Inclusive Essential Services). It advances Goals 1-4 of the EUR Joint Regional Strategy. Consistent with these strategic plans, the Mission will strengthen respect for individual liberty, the rule of law, separation of powers, democratic institutions, independent media and civil society and promote education modernization to drive inclusive and sustainable development. The Mission will also strengthen the ability of Greek civil society to resist malign influence and counter disinformation.

Objective 3.1 | The deepening of exchanges between U.S. and Greek academic institutions, professors, and students advances U.S. best practices in education and supports the internationalization of Greece’s education system.

  • Objective 3.1 Justification | The current Government of Greece is motivated to internationalize the Greek education system and seeks to forge new global The United States is Greece’s preferred partner, but other actors vie for the Ministry of Education’s attention, most notably China. By expanding and deepening U.S. and Greek educational ties, we help generate graduates who are prepared to meet the demands of the modern economy, while reinforcing the United States as their partner of choice.

Objective 3.1 Linkages | 2021 Interim National Security Guidance, State-USAID 2022- 2026 Joint Strategic Plan Objectives 1.5 and 3.1, Goals 2 and 4 of the EUR Joint Regional Strategy

  • Objective 3.1 Risks | China is actively working to expand its academic relationship with Greece, largely through institutional partnerships and Memoranda of Understanding. If the United States does not stay highly engaged in the Greek educational space and does not maintain its close working relationships at all levels of the Ministry of Education, China will seek to fill that void. Following Brexit, the UK is also actively seeking to increase academic exchanges and may eclipse the S. as a destination of choice.

Objective 3.2 | Greek civil society, businesses, and government partners promote democracy, human rights, equal treatment and support for inclusion of marginalized and vulnerable members of society, including women, refugees, migrants, and individuals with disabilities

  • Objective 3.2 Justification | By encouraging Greeks at all levels to apply democratic values to their most pressing challenges, we promote principles of diversity, equity, and inclusion while mitigating threats to the international rules-based order. In recent years Greek civil society actors have become more reliable partners. We will continue to support their development by providing funding opportunities and capacity building efforts, and by advocating for projects which advance the status of marginalized groups in Greek
  • Objective 3.2 Linkages | 2021 Interim National Security Guidance; State-USAID 2022- 2026 Joint Strategic Plan Objectives 1.4, 1.5, 3.1, 3.2, 3.4, 3.5; Goals 2 and 4 of the EUR Joint Regional Strategy
  • Objective 3.2 Risks | Public perceptions of U.S. credibility remains a risk, especially following the S. withdrawal from Afghanistan and domestic tensions. To mitigate this risk, we will continue to showcase on social media U.S. leadership on global human rights issues. Failure to accomplish objective 3.2 is a threat to the human rights of marginalized groups in Greece. If Greece does not improve inclusivity of women and marginalized groups, its economy will not take advantage of the full range of talentsavailable to it, create the conditions to counter “brain drain,” and may fall behind as a U.S. trade and investment partner. To mitigate this risk, we continue to support capacity building initiatives to help Greece improve inclusivity.

Objective 3.3 | Media engagement plus public diplomacy programs drive Greek capacity- building in innovation, technology, entrepreneurship, digital economy, environmental protection, and the creative industries, while countering malign influence, advancing shared democratic values, and promoting U.S. and NATO military alliances

  • Objective 3.3 Justification | By building Greek capacity in key areas, we ensure Greece is resilient and equipped to respond to challenges of the 21st We encourage U.S.-Greece cooperation in the economy, defense, and civil society, promote positive views of the United States, and promote a Greek public that is able to identify misinformation by malign actors.
  • Objective 3.3 Linkages | 2021 Interim National Security Guidance; State-USAID 2022- 2026 Joint Strategic Plan Objectives 1.2, 1.4, 1.5, 2.4, 3.1; Goals 2 and 4 of the EUR Joint Regional Strategy
  • Objective 3.3 Risks | A Greece that is able to respond to its own challenges effectively is a better global partner. We promote U.S.-Greek partnerships not only to help support Greece, but also to emphasize that the United States is a reliable, transparent partner, and that other global actors may have questionable motivations. Without active U.S. communications emphasizing our shared democratic values, economic opportunities, and the importance of the NATO alliance, Russia and China will succeed in efforts to erode trust and confidence in the U.S. and the transatlantic alliance. We mitigate these risks by supporting local initiatives and civil society organizations, as well as through forward-leaning media content highlighting our

Mission Goal 4 | Support and serve U.S. citizens traveling or residing in Greece

Description | The Mission has no higher priority than the to protect the lives and serve the interests of U.S. citizens overseas. This Mission Goal focuses on supporting U.S. citizens throughout their lives, from documenting the citizenship of children of U.S. citizens, to supporting them with federal benefits and special consular services in their time of need, and even at the end of life. The Mission will provide the full range of both routine and emergency services to U.S. citizens residing in or visiting Greece, and continue to expand and enhance our relationships with host country contacts and develop the Mission’s ability to respond in times of crisis.

Objective 4.1 | U.S. citizens residing or temporarily visiting Greece are protected and supported through the delivery of consular and related federal services in a vigilant, efficient, and timely manner

  • Objective 4.1 Justification | Serving and protecting U.S. citizens abroad is a core responsibility of the Department of State. More than 1.2 million U.S. tourists visited Greece annually before the pandemic, and Greek tourism officials are heavily promoting and expecting a return to those levels. Additionally, over 100,000 U.S. citizen reside in Greece, primarily Greek-Americans. We will protect our citizens by providing a range of Federal Benefits, passport and citizenship, and special consular services in the event of death, destitution, disaster, or medical emergency. Continued success in our mission depends on becoming more efficient and effective through modernization, coordination with Mission Greece colleagues and host country contacts, and by expansion of our capabilities to interact with and inform U.S. citizens in Greece. The Mission will meet 21st century standards for providing timely, vigilant, and efficient services and information to U.S. citizens, which includes providing equitable access to information and services. We will review how we use our communication platforms to improve whom we are reaching, as well as how diverse populations receive information so all residents and travelers in Greece can make informed decisions about travel and access our services. We will also focus on developing and maintaining relationships with contacts essential to best assist S. citizens, and on emergency preparedness.
  • Objective 4.1 Linkages | JSP Objectives 5.1 and 5.2, Bureau of Consular Affairs FBS, Social Security Agency Strategic Plan, O. 14012

Objective 4.1 Risks | Unanticipated increases in demand for services, or unforeseen natural, public, health, or other crises impacting the public and Mission Greece could lead to delays in our ability to provide timely services. Failure to address equity and accessibility in our information and services will result in underserved populations not receiving critical safety and security information or not being able to access our services when they need them. Inadequate resources, to include under-resourcing of both personnel and financial needs, present serious risks to the Mission’s ability to provide timely services and reach populations in need in a country whose geography presents significant challenges. This objective highlights the need for the Mission to be adaptable and employ current best practices in how it provides routine and crisis services and information to U.S. citizens. We seek to mitigate these risks by ensuring that all personnel are trained in crisis management, by working with HR and CA to update position descriptions and fill vacancies, and by planning redundancies and seeking innovation in our information

4.   Management Objectives

Management Objective 1 | The Mission launches a cost-effective and agile management platform that improves workforce performance, efficiency, and effectiveness

  • Management Objective 1 Justification | Mission Greece’s ICS goals demand a strong and agile management support platform. Mission Greece continues to grow because of the expanding alliance and shared efforts to block malign influence in the region. The resulting increase in personnel mission-wide requires that we improve our infrastructure and platform. At the same time, post receives a high number of official visits, which demand considerable support. Mission Greece operates significant infrastructure including an aging chancery, several annex buildings, consulate space in Thessaloniki, a challenging housing pool, and government-owned residences. The chancery major rehabilitation project, with a planned completion in 2025, will provide a modern and secure workspace. The new space will enable the mission to function at its fullest potential, without the current distractions from outdated facilities and loss of community caused by our sprawl across multiple locations. By centralizing our operations at the new facility, we expect to engender a greater sense of community and improve the efficacy and efficiency of our operations. Post has an average customer to service provider ratio among selected comparator missions but seeks to improve performance and
  • Management Objective 1 Linkages | IT Strategic Plan FY2019-2022 Goals 1-5; JSP FY2018-2022 Goal 2.2, Goal 4, Plain Writing Act of 2020, Executive Order on Transforming Federal Customer Experience and Service Delivery to Rebuild Trust in Government, Executive Order 13571, Executive Order 13707, Executive Order 13985
  • Management Objective 1 Risks | Unanticipated increases in demand for services, or unforeseen natural, health, or other crises impacting Mission Greece could lead to delays in our ability to provide timely Unexpected construction project delays may further postpone the move to the new building and increase costs. After moving into a new space, the building is under warranty for one year and changes cannot be made. This is a critical time to evaluate the operation of the building and to determine if staffing and budgetary levels are sufficient. Though the number of LE Staff reaching mandatory retirement does not exceed an average of 3% over the next 5 years, post must develop a system to provide an orderly succession that prevents the loss of institutional knowledge of key positions.

Management Objective 2 | The Mission enhances the safety and security of work and living environments enabling personnel to achieve mission goals and promoting wellness and a sense of community

  • Management Objective 2 Justification | Achieving the first Management Objective requires a physical infrastructure that promotes operational efficiency, is consistent with greening goals, while considering an operating environment that is subject to disruption from natural events. Exercising emergency response plans and upgrading security infrastructure enables personnel to perform the essential functions they are here to carry out.
  • Management Objective 2 Linkages | JSP FY2018-2022 Goal 4
  • Management Objective 2 Risks | With the uncertainty surrounding the pandemic, surveys, drills or exercises may be modified to a virtual platform, be rescheduled, or Participation may be limited due to employees working remotely or other flexible working arrangements. Furthermore, alert levels affect travel and shipments of diplomatic pouch (classified and unclassified) and mail operations. If project funds are not awarded or USG spending decreases, that may affect mission operations. An earthquake or natural disaster such as a forest fire may affect operations.
spot_img

ΑΦΗΣΤΕ ΜΙΑ ΑΠΑΝΤΗΣΗ

εισάγετε το σχόλιό σας!
παρακαλώ εισάγετε το όνομά σας εδώ

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Διαβάστε ακόμα

Stay Connected

2,900ΥποστηρικτέςΚάντε Like
2,767ΑκόλουθοιΑκολουθήστε
31,000ΣυνδρομητέςΓίνετε συνδρομητής
- Advertisement -

Τελευταία Άρθρα